Dilnot care funding reforms ‘to face hostile public reaction’

The Dilnot commission's proposed reforms of care funding will face a hostile reaction because many people still believe social care should be entirely state-funded.

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The Dilnot commission’s proposed reforms of care funding will face a hostile reaction because many people still believe social care should be entirely state-funded.

That was the warning today from housing and care provider Anchor, who found that 44% of Britons believed the state should fund all their care costs in a survey of over 2,000 people.

This option has been ruled out by the Dilnot commission, which delivers its recommendations on reforming care funding in England next Monday. Instead, the commission will call for social care costs to be split between the state and the individual, probably by calling for individuals’ contributions to be capped at £50,000.

However, just 11% of respondents to the Anchor survey thought care costs should be split between the state and the individual.

“We know that care funding is facing a black hole, but our research suggests that the Dilnot commission’s findings will be met with a hostile reaction from members of the public,” said Anchor chief executive Jane Ashcroft.

“The government needs to acknowledge that the findings will not be the end of the road, but just the first step on the journey toward a sustainable new model for older people’s care.”

Anchor also found that just 6% of those aged over 45 had started saving for their social care needs in older age.

The not-for-profit provider is calling for the government to appoint a minister for older people to ensure their views are better represented in public debate.

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