Child poverty focus needed to meet outcomes, says head of Sure Start

    Child poverty will have to be tackled more rigorously if the five
    outcomes set out by children in the Every Child Matters green paper
    and the Children Act 1989 are to be achieved, experts warned last
    week.

    The head of Sure Start, Naomi Eisentadt, told Community Care LIVE
    Children and Families that the government had allowed the impact of
    poverty to slip down its agenda.

    Instead it had prioritised the other four outcomes on children’s
    health, safety, achievement and contribution to communities.

    She said that, despite poverty being the key barrier to children’s
    life chances, the government had failed to give adequate attention
    to the outcome on children’s economic well-being.

    “It’s harder to be healthy when you’re poor, it’s harder to stay
    safe when you’re poor, and it’s harder to do well at school when
    you’re poor,” she said, calling for economic well-being to be
    pushed up the agenda.

    Carole Bell, head of commissioning, quality assurance and review at
    Hammersmith and Fulham children’s trust, told delegates that none
    of the outcomes would be achieved if staff did not believe in the
    merits and power of joint-working.

    “We have to convince a lot of people that working together will
    work,” Bell said.

    But Westminster director of social and community services Julie
    Jones admitted that the complexity of what councils were being
    asked to do was “overwhelming”.

    Jones said the best outcome for all children was to achieve well in
    school. But there were major challenges for the council’s education
    of children in care team, including the number of local education
    authorities they had to deal with, a lack of school places and
    placement moves.

    She called on front-line education and social services staff to
    remain “joined at the hip” but acknowledged that this was
    complicated. Child poverty will have to be tackled more rigorously
    if the five outcomes set out by children in the Every Child Matters
    green paper and the Children Act 1989 are to be achieved, experts
    warned last week.

    The head of Sure Start, Naomi Eisentadt, told Community Care LIVE
    Children and Families that the government had allowed the impact of
    poverty to slip down its agenda.

    Instead it had prioritised the other four outcomes on children’s
    health, safety, achievement and contribution to communities.
    She said that, despite poverty being the key barrier to children’s
    life chances, the government had failed to give adequate attention
    to the outcome on children’s economic well-being.

    “It’s harder to be healthy when you’re poor, it’s harder to stay
    safe when you’re poor, and it’s harder to do well at school when
    you’re poor,” she said, calling for economic well-being to be
    pushed up the agenda.

    Carole Bell, head of commissioning, quality assurance and review at
    Hammersmith and Fulham children’s trust, told delegates that none
    of the outcomes would be achieved if staff did not believe in the
    merits and power of joint-working.

    “We have to convince a lot of people that working together will
    work,” Bell said.
    But Westminster director of social and community services Julie
    Jones admitted that the complexity of what councils were being
    asked to do was “overwhelming”.

    Jones said the best outcome for all children was to achieve well in
    school. But there were major challenges for the council’s education
    of children in care team, including the number of local education
    authorities they had to deal with, a lack of school places and
    placement moves.

    She called on front-line education and social services staff to
    remain “joined at the hip” but acknowledged that this was
    complicated. Child poverty will have to be tackled more rigorously
    if the five outcomes set out by children in the Every Child Matters
    green paper and the Children Act 1989 are to be achieved, experts
    warned last week.

    The head of Sure Start, Naomi Eisentadt, told Community Care LIVE
    Children and Families that the government had allowed the impact of
    poverty to slip down its agenda.

    Instead it had prioritised the other four outcomes on children’s
    health, safety, achievement and contribution to communities.
    She said that, despite poverty being the key barrier to children’s
    life chances, the government had failed to give adequate attention
    to the outcome on children’s economic well-being.

    “It’s harder to be healthy when you’re poor, it’s harder to stay
    safe when you’re poor, and it’s harder to do well at school when
    you’re poor,” she said, calling for economic well-being to be
    pushed up the agenda.

    Carole Bell, head of commissioning, quality assurance and review at
    Hammersmith and Fulham children’s trust, told delegates that none
    of the outcomes would be achieved if staff did not believe in the
    merits and power of joint-working.

    “We have to convince a lot of people that working together will
    work,” Bell said.

    But Westminster director of social and community services Julie
    Jones admitted that the complexity of what councils were being
    asked to do was “overwhelming”.

    Jones said the best outcome for all children was to achieve well in
    school. But there were major challenges for the council’s education
    of children in care team, including the number of local education
    authorities they had to deal with, a lack of school places and
    placement moves.

    She called on front-line education and social services staff to
    remain “joined at the hip” but acknowledged that this was
    complicated.

    More from Community Care

    Comments are closed.