Thursday 17th February 2005

    By Derren Hayes, Maria Ahmed and Amy Taylor

     

    Ethnic minority women face ‘massive
    inequalities’

    Black and minority ethnic women are poorer, less healthy, less
    educated and significantly worse represented in the corridors of
    power than both white women and the rest of the UK population,
    according to research by the Fawcett society published today.
    The Guardian, Thursday 17 February 2005, page 4
     
    Forced marriage rate is soaring

    The number of forced marriages in Britain is rising
    dramatically, the Metropolitan police said yesterday. The police
    investigated 200 cases last year, five times the number in
    2001.
    The Daily Mail, Thursday 17 February 2005, page 35
     
    Mother upstages Blair on live TV show

    Maria Hutchings, a mother of an autistic child, blasted Tony
    Blair on ‘The Wright Stuff’ on Channel Five yesterday
    over the closure of a special school. Later, Essex county council
    denied the school Cedar Hall in Thundersley, was under
    threat.
    The Independent, Thursday 17 February 2005, page 21
     
    Tories target teenage sex and drinking

    Teenage binge drinkers who sleep around are to be targeted by
    the Tories in a crackdown on “early and unprotected
    sex” which they said had reached “epidemic”
    proportions.
    The Independent, Thursday 17 February 2005, page 27
     
    Someone to watch over you

    Children living in care often do badly at school. Could a new
    scheme in the London borough of Barnet inspired by Dickens’
    Great Expectations be the answer?
    The Independent, Education and Careers, Thursday 17 February 2005,
    pages 4-5
     
    Step up for a challenge

    The need for volunteers with a range of experience is more
    pressing than ever
    The Independent, Graduate, Thursday 17 February 2005, page 2
     
    Migrant’s fate demolishes village unity

    Legal workers in an illegal hostel left homeless and jobless in
    Gosberton, Lincolnshire.
    The Times, Thursday 17 February 2005, page 31
     
    ‘Fake’ refugees target Wales

    Three Romanians who attempted to enter Wales with fake Irish
    passports were uncovered yesterday.
    Check-in-staff at Cardiff International Airport became suspicious
    of the group when they could not speak any English at all.
    The Romanian nationals arrived on a charter flight from Innsbruck,
    Austria. It was unclear whether they were planning to seek asylum
    in Wales.
    Western Mail, Thursday, 17 February

    £10m care project facing axe after failing to
    deliver

    A £10m NHS care project for vulnerable people and children
    is facing collapse amid claims of mismanagement and in-fighting.
    Scottish executive insiders working on the eCare project claim the
    scheme is to be scrapped and auditors have been brought in to
    establish exactly what went wrong. The project uses an electronic
    database to allow local authorities and the NHS to share
    information on patients, with the aim of cutting bureaucracy and
    integrating services.
    The Scotsman, 17 February

    Jamieson heckled by teen tipplers

    Cathy Jamieson, the justice minister, was harangued by youths
    during a visit to her constituency to launch a Scottish executive
    initiative to tackle the “Buckfast culture”.
    Teenagers at Auchinleck in Ayrshire shouted: “Don’t ban
    Buckie” and openly drank the alcohol. Jamieson arrived at the
    village’s Co-operative store to unveil the Standing Up to
    Antisocial Behaviour awards – the store has decided to ban
    sales of Buckfast to under 21s.
    The Scotsman, 17 February

    Ministers admit estimates for free care were
    wrong

    The population estimates on which the policy of free care for
    the elderly was based were wrong, the Scottish executive has
    admitted. Figures released to the Herald show the corrected
    projections will add 9 per cent to the annual cost of the policy by
    2022, taking it up to an annual cost by then of £274m.
    However, recent research by economists predict the cost of the
    policy could approach £400m.
    The Herald, 17 February

    Smoker told to pipe down

    A resident at a sheltered house scheme in Inverness assaulted a
    care worker after she told him he couldn’t smoke his pipe there.
    Blind Henry Ross said smoking was one of the few pleasures he had
    left and grabbed her. Ross’s pipe was setting off the fire alarm
    which led to emergency fire service callouts.
    The Record, 17 February

    Angry mum in live TV bust up with Blair

    Maria Hutchings confronted Tony Blair on Five chat show the
    Wright Stuff yesterday to protest at the closure of her autistic
    son’s special school. She interrupted a debate on schools,
    shouting: ‘Tony, that’s rubbish.’ After Blair agreed to look into
    the case personally Hutchings, from Essex, was escorted back to her
    seat.
    The Record, 17 February

     

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