THE ETHICS OF WELFARE: HUMAN RIGHTS, DEPENDENCY AND RESPONSIBILITY

    THE ETHICS OF WELFARE: HUMAN RIGHTS, DEPENDENCY AND
    RESPONSIBILITY

    Edited by Hartley Dean, Policy Press

    ISBN 1861345623, £25

    Star Rating: 3/5

    This journey explores themes such as definitions and
    interpretations of human rights, cultural concepts of different
    perceived types of citizen, and the Third Way political orthodoxy
    (which is described deliciously as “ethically deficient”), writes
    Ashling Sans.

    En route there are debates about collective responsibilities as
    interdependent beings, as opposed to the more popular
    individualistic concept.

    The journey concludes (without giving away the ending) by
    looking at the relationship between state, family and
    community.

    The book is based on in-depth interviews with the public, social
    workers, benefits administrators and service users.

    There are some intriguing results. For example, interviews with
    social workers made them appear to be more judgemental of welfare
    claimants than the benefits administrators.

    Although essentially this is an academic book, it would be of
    help to anyone working in welfare or benefits provision or social
    services.

    Ashling Sans is senior caseworker, community care law,
    Turpin, Miller and Higgins solicitors, Oxford.

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