News round up: Sexualised primary pupils worry Ofsted

    Sexualised primary pupils worry Ofsted

    Ofsted inspectors investigating an increase in exclusions from primary schools have discovered “worrying” levels of sexual behaviour among very young children.

    An inquiry into schools that have repeatedly suspended pupils as young as four has unearthed high incidences of children touching other children inappropriately and using sexually graphic language as well as swearing, attacking staff and throwing furniture.
    Read more on this story in The Guardian

    Peter Beresford: We need a national social care services

    There is a broad consensus, which includes the government, that the present system of social care funding is untenable. Yet with the publication of the green paper expected next week, there is little agreement or clarity about how social care should be funded for the future, with minimal evidence-based discussion about what will actually work. Instead, the preoccupation remains with satisfying short-term political and economic considerations.

    Read more on this story in Society Guardian

    Why isn’t telecare being taken up more widely?

    The government’s long-awaited social care plans are likely to back telecare. So why isn’t it being taken up more widely?

    Read more on this story in Society Guardian

    Why frontline childcare workers are the unsung heroes

    Residential staff and family social workers deserve more credit for the contribution they make to the lives of many of our vulnerable young people, says Lord Listowel.

    Read more on this story in Society Guardian

    Shadow of youth unemployment returns to cities blighted in the 1980s

    Northern cities such as Hull and Sunderland that were battered by industrial decline in the 1980s have become the blackspots for youth unemployment in this recession, according to a report that calls for the government to target financial help on the worst-hit areas.

    Read more on this story in The Guardian

    £1m asylum seekers scheme helps just one family

    A government scheme to help failed asylum seekers return home which cost around £1 million resulted in just one family leaving the UK, it has been claimed.
    The Children’s Society said the scheme, which ran for less than a year, failed because of the government’s confused approach.

    Read more on this story in The Daily Telegraph

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